"Money Monster" REVIEWS

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"Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Fri Apr 29, 2016 1:21 pm

a not very encouraging article

http://www.hollywood-elsewhere.com/2016 ... -grousing/

what do you think the score at RT and MC will be?
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby swamer on Fri Apr 29, 2016 2:09 pm

I really want Foster to get some good notices for MM especially that she started promoting the movie more than George and Julia and erlier than them.
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby Mark on Fri Apr 29, 2016 4:05 pm

that article isn't entirely true. they have been screening it.

i think it will do 50 meteoritic.

i really have no idea how it does box office.
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Tue May 10, 2016 9:06 pm

the first reviews should be out on may 12 in the late morning, after its screened for the press in cannes.

i hope it's at least 55-60% fresh on RT...
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby Yanzi on Wed May 11, 2016 6:21 pm

First review is out and it's pretty positive, but calls Julia's performance "curious". His reasoning is even more curious IMO:

There’s always the possibility that the audience will lose interest in a movie where the plot is deeply entangled in money matters. But Director Jodie Foster cashes in on the superb work of George Clooney and Jack O’Connell to make sure there are never any monetary dull spots in “Money Monster.”

The performances by Clooney and O’Connell are money in the bank.


The curious performance comes from Julia Roberts as the director of the TV show. This is the latest role for the Oscar-winning actress where she plays a character with bottled up emotions.

Her character in “Secret in Their Eyes” was an emotional wreck, while her role in “Mother’s Day” was as a woman more guarded than Fort Knox. “Money Monster” has her playing a person who must stay calm while all others are falling apart, but it would be nice to see Roberts take on a role where she could just let go. She has one of the best laughs in Hollywood and it has been awhile since she showed it off.


http://tucson.com/entertainment/movies/ ... 30ce2.html
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby Yanzi on Wed May 11, 2016 6:52 pm

Look like the reviewer broke the embargo too soon so he quickly took it down.
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Thu May 12, 2016 6:33 am

french short review, it seems positive

http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/cinema/m ... 90741.html
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby OrientExpress on Thu May 12, 2016 6:37 am

First review on RT

3/5 stars


Film review: Money Monster - Jodie Foster holds Wall St to account in hostage thriller

Dog Day Afternoon meets The Big Short as Foster generates enough suspense and genuine laughs to sustain our interest – at least until the earnestness of film’s message about high finance takes over


George Clooney plays a slippery TV financial adviser taken hostage by a desperate investor live on air in the polished but predictable Money Monster, Jodie Foster’s first directing effort since 2011’s The Beaver. Unfolding like Dog Day Afternoon meets The Big Short , the film attempts to hold the Wall Street elite accountable for the horrors of high-risk finance, but operates more successfully when simply looking to entertain.

Lee Gates (Clooney) is a Jim Cramer-esque Wall Street pundit, whose bullish predictions can win or lose his viewers millions of dollars in seconds. One such victim is the bomb-wielding kidnapper Kyle (Jack O’Connell), who lost everything when a trading fund Gates recommended lost US$800 million overnight.



Gunning for answers from the fund’s CEO (Dominic West), Kyle hijacks Gates’ morning TV show, forcing its director (Julia Roberts) to keep them on the air until the truth is revealed. Roberts – in a role Foster could easily have played herself – represents a voice of measured maturity in Gates’ ear throughout his ordeal, operating as a counterbalance to his naturally anti-authoritarian petulance.


Rising British star Jack O’Connell ( Unbroken ) adds a degree of depth and humanity to Kyle’s admittedly one-note character, while Caitriona Balfe offers weighty support as the fund’s smooth-talking communications chief, struggling to deflect blame away from her boss at all costs. Not even Clooney’s innate charm, however, can transform the loathsome Gates into someone worth caring for, even after he experiences his moral epiphany.

Foster again proves herself a more than efficient filmmaker, keeping tensions high as events unfold in almost real time. Money Monster may offer few surprises for audiences familiar with hostage thriller protocol, but Foster generates enough suspense and genuine laughs from the scenario to sustain our interest – at least until the earnestness and finger-wagging inevitably take over.


http://www.scmp.com/culture/film-tv/art ... nt-hostage

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/money_monster/
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Thu May 12, 2016 8:09 am

Review: ‘Money Monster’ isn’t all it could have been
Colin Covert, Star Tribune (Minneapolis) 12:08 a.m. EDT May 12, 2016
'Money Monster' movie review



Lee Gates, the main man in the complex thriller “Money Monster,” plays a popular stock specialist on live television, telling viewers what to buy, sell or hold. He looks and acts like the classic stereotype of a Wall Street whiz on TV — $5,000 suit, winning smile, sharp patter.

Lee, played by the handsome and genial George Clooney, is big on TV because even when his proposals are risky, they sound brilliant. If he warns that your retirement savings will tank unless you stockpile Nigerian hedge funds, his polished presentation could sway you, as long as he stays in character.

Remorselessly vain Lee is like the friendliest gaming table croupier you’ll ever meet. But when one of the biggest bets he is pushing crashes, a furious young investor bursts onto his show with a gun and explosive vest, and overinflated Lee finds himself to be, sadly, a mere mortal. Police raids, hostage negotiations, gripping action sequences and high ratings for Lee’s broadcast ensue as his life falls apart.

“Money Monster,” the fourth feature directed by Jodie Foster, resembles Lee. It’s fairly smart and has fetching features, but it’s only kind of good.

At the plot level, it’s sometimes murky when you want it to snap into plausibility, and you often get the feeling that Foster’s instincts as a director outpace the abilities of her screenwriting team. Still, what she delivers is infernally attractive.

The film is a sort of crime thriller and a kind of critique of malfeasance by Wall Street’s masters of the universe. But mainly, it’s a portrait of a man whose life is quickly turned upside down, inside out and nearly shot full of holes. Clooney is great as a narcissist with multiple divorces and a messy emotional life who’s being publicly dragged through the whole nine yards. When he begins connecting with the blue-collar guy holding him prisoner (Jack O’Connell), we wonder whether Lee’s increasing decency is just another act for the camera.

Clooney’s shifting approach to this antihero part is so different in terms of energy that when he steps away from his glib broadcast role, it’s a relief. O’Connell, playing an unruly one-man riot, is asked to do little more than brandish weapons and shout threats, which he does with chaotic energy.

Julia Roberts adds a grace note to the story as Lee’s producer, who remains in the control room and tries to handle the crisis. Stage managing her anxious star performer through the lifeline of his earphone, she guides him into conversations with the terrorist that prevent the siege from literally exploding. She also has the nearest thing to an emotional connection to the main character, talking him out of the slick persona he peddles on camera and back to real humanity.

Foster has made a long acting-producing-directing career out of working with gifted people on excellent films and recent TV fare like “House of Cards” and “Orange Is the New Black.” She takes a surprising step here and doesn’t stumble with the story, which finds accusations of dishonesty triggering investigations into stock manipulation, high-tech detective work and the appearance of a billionaire tycoon with an agenda of his own.

The movie transmutes from high-stakes suspense to the human comedy while it hops from Manhattan to Korea, South Africa and Iceland. That’s a lot of shifting to do, and Foster manages it without stripping the gears.

http://www.freep.com/story/entertainmen ... /84251636/
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Thu May 12, 2016 8:11 am

negative :-(


‘Money Monster’ review: Tale of economic bust lacks payoff

Updated May 12, 2016 12:30 AM
By Rafer Guzmán rafer.guzman@newsday.com



BOTTOM LINE

A potentially topical thriller marred by pandering dialogue and clumsy plotting. Spend your money elsewhere.

After the economic collapse of 2008, Jon Stewart and his “Daily Show” staffers focused their outrage on Jim Cramer, a former hedge-fund manager whose popular financial news show, “Mad Money,” had been consistently upbeat on the very banks that tanked the economy. After days of Stewart’s attacks, Cramer came on the show. Their confrontation, in which Cramer came off looking like a journalist who failed his duties when America needed him most — basically, the Judith Miller of the financial press — drew a whopping 2.3 million viewers.

Among them, surely, were the three screenwriters of “Money Monster.” They’ve come up with a clever idea: What if it wasn’t Stewart who targeted Cramer but a furious investor with a gun and a bomb? Put them both on live television, add a bit of global intrigue — not to mention Jodie Foster as director — and you’ve got the makings of a topical popcorn thriller.

And check out the cast. George Clooney plays the Cramer-esque Lee Gates, whose garish show, “Money Monster,” peddles financial analysis in the guise of trashy entertainment (Clooney’s hip-hop dance routines are inspired). Julia Roberts plays his loyal producer, Patty Fenn, who stays in the studio even when a guy named Kyle (Jack O’Connell) storms onto the set waving a gun. Kyle has two questions: How did Ibis Clear Capital lose $800 million of its investors’ money, and why didn’t Gates see it coming?


The answers are highly unsatisfying. “Money Monster” tries to channel populist anger but doesn’t have an iota of substance. The dialogue sounds like a collection of trending hashtags — rigged system, government bailout, complicit media — but none of it addresses any real issue. The story centers on high-frequency trading, a real and fairly frightening technological development, but the twists feel highly unsophisticated. (One bit of crucial evidence is obtained after a five-second Google search.) It’s no spoiler to say that the villain is a shady CEO played by Dominic West. He’s strung up in effigy by this pandering film so quickly that you almost feel sorry for him.

“Money Monster” is one of those C-grade thrillers that depends on implausible behavior, unlikely coincidences and slow-moving cops to get by. It’s definitely not worth the investment.

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/mo ... 1.11790045
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Thu May 12, 2016 8:14 am

Review: ‘Money Monster’ thriller pays off for Jodie Foster
Bill Goodykoontz, USA TODAY NETWORK 1:16 a.m. EDT May 12, 2016

George Clooney plays a blowhard financial-show host taken hostage by a disgruntled viewer (Jack O’Connell) in Jodie Foster’s thriller. Julia Roberts is especially good as the show’s producer.

Story Highlights

The film shifts its blame along the way
The acting is uniformly good, but Roberts is the standout
Critic’s rating: 3 stars out 4



There is a nice economy to “Money Monster,” director Jodie Foster’s film about an egomaniacal financial-advice TV host (think Jim Cramer’s bombast with George Clooney’s looks).

No pun intended. A lot happens in a relatively short amount of time (the movie is 98 minutes long), and there is little wasted effort. The film whirs along with such entertaining efficiency that you may not realize that, by the end, it has shifted its blame in a manner that does not exactly betray a lack of courage in its convictions, but a willingness to let some of the bad guys off the hook.

Lee Gates (Clooney, indeed) hosts “Money Monster,” one of those shows where the host examines the stock market and tells you what to sell and what to buy, only this one seems heavily influenced by “Sábado Gigante.” Dancing girls march out with Gates, there are lots of whiz-bang special effects (almost exclusively of the annoying variety), yet the most noticeable feature of the show is Gates’ arrogant smugness.

It’s not an act. Before the show, talking over earpieces and microphones with producer Patty Fenn (Julia Roberts), Gates brags that he has not eaten dinner alone since the ’90s. He is one of those people who do not just assume they are always right. He knows he is and, by extension, that means everyone else is wrong. He’s a jerk, but the ratings are good and in television, that’s all that matters. (E! doesn’t keep producing seasons of “Keeping Up with the Kardashians” as a public service.)

During one show, a delivery man wanders into the camera’s frame. Fenn isn’t particularly concerned; Gates goes off script so often anything can happen, and it’s up to her to keep things on track. But it quickly becomes evident that this isn’t a delivery man. It’s a man with a gun and a bomb, and he blames Gates for recommending a stock that inexplicably tanked. He wants answers or everyone dies.

Somewhere, a real-life cable producer is kicking himself, wondering, “Why didn’t I think of that?” But here, the fear is real. It doesn’t take long to figure out who the man is: Kyle Budwell (Jack O’Connell), who gambled all he had, largely an inheritance from his mother, on the bum tip Gates provided and lost.

At this point, the film becomes a hostage drama, but there’s more: Gates doesn’t really know why the stock crashed, either. Conveniently enough, he was to interview Walt Camby (Dominic West), the CEO of the company in question, on air that day. But Camby canceled and spokeswoman Diane Lester (Caitrion Balfe) steps in, to Gates’ obvious disappointment.

With a gun at his head, sometimes literally, Gates wants answers. But Camby is off the grid, jet-setting around, as is evidently his wont. Can Gates find out what happened? And can he hold Budwell off long enough to stay alive to do so?

Those are the film’s stakes, life or death on live television. Reality TV has become so sordid that, frankly, it’s not as shocking a notion as it once was, but it’s still pretty remarkable. A film like this, locked largely in one place (though the search for Camby goes all over the world) is heavily dependent upon the actors, and they are all good. Clooney, an underrated actor (he’s too often thought of simply as a celebrity), oozes charisma as a general thing; it’s not much of a stretch to add a layer of smugness on top of that. O’Connell is one of the best actors working today (see “Starred Up,” please).

Ultimately, however, the women carry the film. Balfe is really good as a loyal soldier contemplating doing the right thing. And Roberts is terrific as Fenn, who is literally, in Foster’s words, producing their survival. I say this as someone who often finds Roberts annoying, too eager to overwhelm the film she’s in (and the other actors in the process). Here, she dials that down, and it’s a perfect fit. Fenn isn’t the star of the show, but she is essential to its success. The same is true of Roberts in the film.

Many people were wronged during the most recent financial meltdown. And many people were to blame. “Money Monster” shifts its blame during the film, as noted. It’s fair and fine to go to the source of the problem, but the film would have fared better not to ease up on the other culprits along the way.

http://www.thetimesherald.com/story/ent ... /84226930/
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby berlioz on Thu May 12, 2016 8:16 am

‘Money Monster’: a watchable TV hostage crisis with George Clooney

2.5 stars out of 4.


An uneasy mixture of thriller and grim comedy, “Money Monster” depicts a situation that seems all too possible. A live-television broadcast, hosted by hammy finance guru Lee Gates (George Clooney), is interrupted by the arrival of an irate follower of the show named Kyle (Jack O’Connell), who’s lost everything after following Gates’ investment advice. He storms onto the set, armed and unstable; Lee and the show’s longtime producer Patty (Julia Roberts) must talk Kyle down and untangle a vast financial conspiracy in front of millions of viewers.

All of this in a tidy 95 minutes sounds promising, right? Unfortunately, “Money Monster,” though perfectly competent, is one of those movies that promises more than it delivers. In the interest of keeping things tight, director Jodie Foster and the screenwriters let the story play out in real time — which means that we barely know Lee and Patty before Kyle wanders onto the set. The stakes aren’t high enough — we’re not sufficiently invested in their fate — and the movie’s blend of suspense, wit and melodrama often feels oddly off-balance. Too bad, because the idea of Clooney as a smarmy, tap-dancing huckster seems like gold. (Literally: He dances in a gold top hat in the show’s opening, and quite decently, too. Would somebody please get this man a musical? With Channing Tatum? But I digress.)

You watch “Money Monster” wishing it were a little better — it’s refreshing to see a summer studio movie that’s neither a superhero epic nor a sequel, and one in which grown-up actors do their jobs. Roberts, as Patty, has a wry efficiency; this character is long-resigned to the fact that she’s not saving the world. (“We don’t do ‘gotcha’ journalism here,” she snaps at a staffer. “We don’t do journalism at all.”) O’Connell (“Unbroken”) finds something vulnerable in the damaged, troubled Kyle and Clooney, of course, can do fast-talking charm in his sleep (but, thankfully, doesn’t). Ultimately, “Money Monster” is always watchable — but forgets to give us a compelling reason to watch.

http://www.seattletimes.com/entertainme ... e-clooney/
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby mcv on Thu May 12, 2016 8:52 am

"not as bad as mother's day" should be a review for the movie. haha

i'm really not interested in the reviews for this one. it's gonna be watchable. but like don't expect high art.
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby Yanzi on Thu May 12, 2016 10:56 am

Variety gives a mildly positive review with good ink for Julia:

When you break apart the essential elements of “Money Monster,” Jodie Foster’s taut yet sporadically odd hostage drama, few of them seem to completely work. As an indictment of Wall Street chicanery, it’s largely toothless; as a pure thriller, it only quickens the pulse once or twice; as a conspiracy saga, its central mystery falls flat.

Yet somehow the film hangs together surprisingly well, thanks to on-point performances from George Clooney and Julia Roberts, a sprinkle of obtuse humor and Foster’s streamlined direction, which takes style notes from the likes of “Dog Day Afternoon” and “Inside Man” in the service of a far more lightweight confection. It may not linger long in the memory after credits roll, and what multiplex audiences make of the film is anyone’s guess, but in a landscape short on no-frills grown-up entertainment, it’s worth the modest time investment.


As the end-of-his-rope hijacker, O’Connell lays the blustery outer-borough shtick on a bit thick, while Roberts holds the screen well despite being confined to a control panel for most of the film. (Given how much of her dialogue is delivered via Lee’s earpiece, hers is almost a voice-over role.) Yet the show is almost stolen entirely by Emily Meade as Kyle’s pregnant girlfriend, brought in by police to attempt an intervention that takes a hilarious left turn. And perhaps that’s appropriate: a well-played minor character walking away with a well-crafted, yet ultimately minor movie.



http://variety.com/2016/film/reviews/ca ... 201771987/
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Re: "Money Monster" REVIEWS

Postby Yanzi on Thu May 12, 2016 11:01 am

The Hollywood Reporter is mixed:

Money Monster therefore emerges as a pretty ordinary film about an extraordinary predicament, one in which the writers contrived to bring all the principals together down on Wall Street. The wrap-up, and the way it too easily employs both comeuppance and tragedy, is rather too neat for real life, and there's a feel-good aspect to it as well in the way the sneaky, morals-free culprit is forced to be held to account in the most public and embarrassing way possible. It's a fantasy, in other words.


Clooney doesn't play a dufus here as he has done repeatedly for the Coen brothers, but his Lee Gates could be a smarter, more successful but jaded second cousin to those rascals. Attached to a phone or microphone most of the time, Roberts has little to play other than on-point efficiency through most of the tight running time, and her best scenes involve her exchanges with the fellow female executive intriguingly played by Balfe (intriguing in that the actress makes you aware that there's much more to her character than meets the eye or that is touched upon in the script). West has no trouble letting the audience feel all the scorn it can summon for the heedlessly amoral, and criminal, big-money guy, by which time poor, working-class Kyle has been frustratingly sidelined in favor of the fat cats.



http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review ... ce=twitter
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